Imagine a country where girls must sneak out to go to school, with deadly consequences if they get caught learning.

I am old enough to remember a time when it was not considered important for girls to have an education, beyond household tasks and child rearing. My grandmothers received little schooling although both were skilled and had prodigious talent. My mother had a chip on her shoulder all of her life because her brother was allowed to go to grammar school, while she was made to leave school at fourteen – Grandfather did not hold with educating girls.

Fortunately, my own father was more enlightened believing that ‘educated mothers educate their children’. I am one of three sisters, I have two daughters, a grand daughter, two nieces and several grand nieces. Thank God that we live in a culture that allows it’s girls to go to school. It would break my heart if all these bright beautiful young women were denied this basic right, and my heart goes out to young women in other cultures who are prepared to go to dangerous lengths to learn while so many of us take our education for granted.

I have recently read Jenny Nordborg’s fascinating account of the Undergroung Girls of Kabul and was amazed by this video so I thought that I would share it with you.

Imagine a country where girls must sneak out to go to school, with deadly consequences if they get caught learning. This was Afghanistan under the Taliban, and traces of that danger remain today. 22-year-old Shabana Basij-Rasikh runs a school for girls in Afghanistan. She celebrates the power of a family’s decision to believe in their daughters — and tells the story of one brave father who stood up to local threats. (Filmed at TEDxWomen)

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Imagine a country where girls must sneak out to go to school, with deadly consequences if they get caught learning.

  1. Unfortunately, here in Australia, kids don’t always value the education that is so freely available. How do we get them to understand how wonderful it is? Maybe we don’t. Maybe that’s a lesson they learn later, if at all. Is it the fault of the educators? Is it too easily come by and so not valued?

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    1. Hi Kate, maybe it’s just human nature to take good things for granted if they’ve always been available and only appreciate them if they’re taken away? i don’t know:-(

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